Families on Streets in Cities

The family on Elm Street here in Madison
moved out very suddenly. The neighbor
between us told me that they had lost their home
to Chase, or some other bank. She was a teacher.
He worked at a bank. Not Chase, I don’t think.
I did not know them. I think they had kids.

The family on Locust Avenue here in Reading
moved out very suddenly. The neighbor
between us told me that they had lost their home
to B of A, or some other bank. She was a teacher.
He worked at a bank. Not B of A, I don’t think.
I did not know them. I think they had kids.

The family on Sycamore Drive here in Silverton
moved out very suddenly. The neighbor
between us told me that they had lost their home
to Wells Fargo, or some other bank. She was a teacher.
He worked at a bank. Not Wells Fargo, I don’t think.
I did not know them. I think they had kids.

The family on Palm Lane here in Riverside
moved out very suddenly. The neighbor
between us told me that they had lost their home
to Citigroup, or some other bank. She was a teacher.
he worked at a bank. Not Citigroup, I don’t think.
I did not know them. I think they had kids.

The families lived on streets and avenues
and drives and lanes. They had neighbors.
They lost their homes to banks, none of which
he worked for, so far as any of us know.
She was a teacher. We think they had kids.
I Google Zillow listings in their towns.

I am beginning to want to know them,
and I think I would walk down the street
to visit. But it is too late. I get those robo-calls.
Flyers from outfits that will pay cash, quick,
for my house. Sight almost unseen. Guaranteed.
Vacant houses bought by rental outfits. You too?

The neighbor who told me all this is moving out.

Richard Fenton Sederstrom was raised and lives in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona and the North Woods of Minnesota. Sederstrom is the author of seven books of poetry, his newest book, Icarus Rising, Misadventures in Ascension, published by Jackpine Writers' Bloc, was released last winter. Read other articles by Richard Fenton.