Bradley Manning: Walking in the Footsteps of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The world now demands a maturity of America that we may not be able to achieve. It demands that we admit that we have been wrong. . . that we have been detrimental to . . .life . . . . The situation is one in which we must be ready to turn sharply from our present ways,” said Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. when speaking of the Vietnam War.

The documents that Bradley Manning has been accused of leaking sharpen the demands of the world upon America and upon ourselves.  The classified documents describe the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as diplomatic cables that show how United States conducts foreign policy.  They show a nation that bullies, threatens, blackmails, spies, wantonly kills civilians and commits wars of aggression – if the U.S. were not the world’s lone superpower it would be considered a rogue state.

Even in the era of Martin Luther King he described the United States as “a society gone mad on war” and “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today.” As then, the responsibility is that of the American people to correct.  As King said of Vietnam: “The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours.”

So on Martin Luther King Day I joined 200 people at the Quantico Marine Base where Bradley Manning, an American citizen not convicted of anything, is being held in solitary confinement, not allowed to exercise in his 6 by 12 foot cell, not given a real pillow or blanket, with no contact with others except guards who make sure he does not sleep during the day after they wake him up at 5 in the morning.

Manning is a patriot.  He is not accused of giving documents demonstrating criminal and unethical actions by the U.S. to Iran, China or Russia; instead, if the allegations against him are true, he gave them to the media so the American people could learn what its government was doing.  He could have sold the documents to the highest bidder, but instead, he allegedly gave them for free to the media.  He could have published them verbatim and put Americans at risk, but instead by allegedly giving them to the media he ensured professional journalists would review them, verify them and weigh their release with national security concerns.

Some argue that Manning should have gone through the chain of command.  In fact, he tried.  When he first saw 15 Iraqis being tortured by the Iraqi government the U.S. put in power and protects he examined the case and discovered they were being tortured for publishing a scholarly article asking where the money in Iraq went.  He brought this to his commander who told him to shut up and round up more Iraqis.  Then he saw on the computer screen widespread war crimes.  He saw that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton turned the State Department into a nest of spies that violated the law by spying on UN diplomats.  If the criminality goes to the Secretary of State, what is the use of going up the chain of command?

And look what the Obama administration has done in response to war crimes.  When it came to torture, President Obama and his Justice Department said they did not want to look back, but only wanted to look forward, and decided not to prosecute those who committed torture.  When the Justice Department’s Office of Professional Responsibility recommended disbarring lawyers who produced legal memoranda to provide false cover for torture, they decided to ignore that recommendation and take no action against the torture lawyers.  When a judge held that CIA officers who destroyed evidence, video tapes of torture were in contempt of court the administration decided not to prosecute.

Now, just as in the time of Dr. King, we must conclude as he did:

My fellow Americans, who, with me, bear the greatest responsibility in ending a conflict that has exacted a heavy price on both continents.

Americans of today bear the responsibility for the actions of our government.  In a representative democracy the people are responsible for the actions of the government.  Now that WikiLeaks has published official reports documenting war crimes, other crimes, unethical behavior and deception of Americans and others, we now know what our government is doing and bear the responsibility to end it.

It is not going to be easy to end a foreign policy that has been off track for many years, indeed, many decades.  Dr. King accurately described abuses going back to the 1950s.  As a result, the current wars, as Dr. King said of the Vietnam War, are “a symptom of a far deeper malady within the American spirit.”

These are deep issues requiring “a true revolution of values” which will “cause us to question the fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies.”  While this seems like an insurmountable task, in fact, there is no reason it cannot be achieved.  Indeed, our country has overcome slavery, segregation, women not being allowed to vote, children forced into labor and widespread unfair treatment of workers and farmers.  More work is needed in all of these areas but obvious progress is being made.

The war economy can also be ended.  As Dr. King said:

There is nothing, except a tragic death wish, to prevent us from reordering our priorities, so that the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. There is nothing to keep us from molding a recalcitrant status quo with bruised hands until we have fashioned it into a brotherhood.

Since President Eisenhower warned us of the military industrial complex, military spending has doubled in real dollars. Under President Obama, the U.S. has produced record military budgets, record intelligence budgets and record arms sales. Now more than half of discretionary spending is for the military.  More and more people are seeing the war economy is not working for them and are organizing to cut war spending.

President Obama, when he decided to run for office, quoted Dr. King’s speech against the Vietnam War where King said: “We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now”.

What would true leadership look like in response to the WikiLeaks documents?  Rather than putting Bradley Manning in pre-trial solitary confinement, a leader would stand with Bradley Manning.  A leader would demand the Secretary of State to resign for directing American diplomats to spy. Real leadership would publish the leaked documents and say –

This is a country of, by and for the people. It is time for us to look in the mirror and see ourselves for what we are. The people now know what American foreign policy does. The people need to discuss and debate this policy. Should America act within the law or should it ignore the law?  Should we threaten and bribe other countries or work with countries to develop policies that make sense for the world?  It is time for a great debate.  It is time for real change.

Bradley Manning, a young man from Oklahoma, believed as many Americans do, that the U.S. is a force for good in the world.  It was not until he was in Iraq and when he saw documents and videos crossing his computer screen that he realized America does not play the role he had been told. Dr. King quoted Langston Hughes in his speech:

O, yes,
I say it plain,
America never was America to me,
And yet I swear this oath–
America will be!

Yes, “America will be” but only if we make it so.  Americans need to support a true American patriot, Bradley Manning, who, if he did what he is accused of, has put his life on the line to show us the truth about American foreign policy and to make us a better nation.  Visit here to join in his defense.  And then read the WikiLeaks documents and engage in discussion and debate with your fellow Americans.  Join our efforts to change U.S. foreign policy

To stand with Bradley visit: Stand With Brad.

To prevent prosecution of WikiLeaks vist: WikiLeaksIsDemocracy.org

To get involved with efforts to end war and reduce military spending visit here.

Kevin Zeese serves as Attorney General in the Green Shadow Cabinet, and is a member of the Steering Committee of the Bradley Manning Support Network and an organizer of Popular Resistance. Read other articles by Kevin, or visit Kevin's website.

25 comments on this article so far ...

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  1. bozh said on January 19th, 2011 at 11:34am #

    talking about 100-yr war, let’s also remember dacamillennial war; the one of ‘noble’ class of life.
    of course, always supported by all cults. and, folks, just a few centuries to go and they’d be over.

    or until the day when few people wld be left and each having an autonomous region–size of that of kosovo!
    as far as stars r concerned, u.s. wars r ephemeral! tnx

  2. Deadbeat said on January 19th, 2011 at 12:17pm #

    It’s hyperbole to the MAX to say that Manning is following in MLK footsteps. It’s rhetoric like Zeese’s is yet another reason why the Left can’t be taken seriously unless it is a deliberate pseudo-Left canard. There are other constructive ways to bring attention to Manning however the jury is still out about WikiLeaks.

  3. kbzeese said on January 19th, 2011 at 12:24pm #

    Deadbeat — it would be “hyperbole to the Max” if I equated Manning to MLK, but that is not what I did. In fact, what happened was, I went back to MLK’s anti-Vietnam war speech on the day of the protest at Quantico (MLK Day) and was struck by how Dr. King’s comments were lighting the path Manning was walking on. As you can see from the article I quote a lot of the speech because it is so relevant to the situation we face today.

  4. Loucleve said on January 19th, 2011 at 4:06pm #

    Geez, I thought Manning was a disgruntled homosexual employee pissed off that his boyfriend was kicked out of the service via DADT, and took it out on his country by passing along these secrets.

    Being a true American patriot never entered the equation. It was simply a “get even” proposition, so lets stick to the facts please.

  5. kbzeese said on January 19th, 2011 at 4:13pm #

    Loucleve: You should look at some of the chat logs and maybe the facts will change your opinion. If the chat logs are accurate (they were reported on Wired) he talks about seeing horrible stuff that should be made public and starting a debate about foreign policy. He also has been quoted talking about finding Iraqis being tortured by the Iraqi government that the U.S. put in power merely for publishing a paper asking where the money went. He brought that to his commander who said ignore it and keep rounding up Iraqis. Those are the facts I’m aware of — what is your source? Hopefully, not the NY Times!! :)

  6. hayate said on January 19th, 2011 at 6:44pm #

    Methinks loucleve is just trolling projections about himself.

  7. Deadbeat said on January 19th, 2011 at 11:44pm #

    kbzeese writes …

    Deadbeat — it would be “hyperbole to the Max” if I equated Manning to MLK, but that is not what I did. In fact, what happened was, I went back to MLK’s anti-Vietnam war speech on the day of the protest at Quantico (MLK Day) and was struck by how Dr. King’s comments were lighting the path Manning was walking on. As you can see from the article I quote a lot of the speech because it is so relevant to the situation we face today.

    I re-read the article in hopes that I missed something but I still draw the same conclusion. Manning was a soldier who was prepared to KILL people in the service of the U.S. government. MLK was not. Manning is a victim of circumstance and one where perhaps had he chose to become a preacher like MLK and engage of a boycott against racism like MLK, in this case a boycott against Israel for which the war on Iraq was truly about, then I would be in agreement with your premise.

    Had the U.S. adhere to the rules of War then the “leaks” would have NO meaning whatsoever. But Manning is in prison because he defied the military codes by which he pledged. King pledges were for justices and righteousness. Again Kevin it is pure hyperbole on your part to force these alignments.

    Manning is probably closer to Daniel Ellsberg who was a disillusion servant of U.S. Imperialism.

    It’s easy to get carried away with MLK’s words but to align those words with Manning is a bit ridiculous and dubious to say the least not to mention that insult to African Americans. This is why once again the Left loses any credibility with people of color.

    You also write …

    Americans of today bear the responsibility for the actions of our government. In a representative democracy the people are responsible for the actions of the government.

    The problem is Kevin that more and more citizens are becoming aware that the United States is neither representative nor a democracy. IMO, American WORKERS bears NO responsibility for the actions of the U.S. Capitalist-Zionist government.

    What would true leadership look like in response to the WikiLeaks documents? Rather than putting Bradley Manning in pre-trial solitary confinement, a leader would stand with Bradley Manning. A leader would demand the Secretary of State to resign for directing American diplomats to spy. Real leadership would publish the leaked documents and say

    A true leader today like Ralph Nader was in 2004 would STAND UP TO the pseudo-Left that SABOTAGED his valiant effort to create a progressive independent 3rd party rather than ALIGN oneself with the very folks that helped to diminish the anti-war movement and have become the first line of defense for Zionism.

  8. halifax said on January 20th, 2011 at 5:27am #

    Fellow readers, with respect–
    I do not consider it relevant to the essential issue contained in this article whether Manning is indeed a “patriot” or a disgruntled, gay soldier. If he did leak documents as described in the article and, as a consequence of this action, is being held in the manner described, is that not the main issue with respect to Manning himself?

    With respect to the linking of Dr. King’s speech to this particular context (vs. Manning, who–like all of us–carries a host of complexities and contradictions), I found it a helpful tool to keep my focus on the painful truth of America’s complicity. There is nothing like the eloquent words of a true leader like Dr. King to remind one that the vision of democracy–regardless of the degree to which it has actually manifested to date–is the ruler by which we, as citizens of any country aspiring to be democratic–measure our responsibilities.

    Finally–and here I will reveal my personal orientation to activism as a neuroscientist whose focus is on the science of consciousness evolution–I appreciate any and all information that is disseminated in a form conducive to the workings of our nonlinear, self-regulating, complex, chaotic adaptive brains. It is the very focus on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s seminal speech in this article that fed both my heart and intellect. In my opinion, we must be vigilant in keeping the voices of our true leaders and visionaries ringing in our ears to keep our sights on what it is we are aspiring to accomplish. As a nonlinear system, the brain can only respond to what it perceives as having already happened–that is, we can’t open a door unless, as far as our brain is concerned, we already have. Most of us, like Manning, are mere mortals who will come and go from this planet having accomplished little or nothing of merit as individuals. It is the visionaries like Dr. King who remind us that democracy is already “here” and therefore it is in accordance with all that is rational and deeply embedded in our essential biology to take our own individual steps in concert with all other members of the organism of humanity in opening that door.

  9. kbzeese said on January 20th, 2011 at 8:00am #

    Well said Halifax!

    Deadbeat. I agree with you that our political system is a mess, more of a fraudulent democracy than a real one which is why I served as Nader’s press secretary and spokesperson in 2004.

    Obviously, Manning did not start out as a preacher, indeed he started at as a brainwashed American youth (it seems) who believed the U.S. was a force for good in the world. But when he saw the torture, war crimes and deception he did something about it (if the allegations are true), that is when he got on the right path. While our democracy is a fraud, it does not have to be a fraud. If Americans wake up and refuse the duopoly their vote things will change quickly. More and more are waking up, a long way to go before we reach the tipping point, but information like WikiLeaks is publishing will help more see the truth.

  10. lichen said on January 21st, 2011 at 4:41pm #

    Oh please, how dare anyone touch the legendary image of MLK, a protestant fundamentalist who had right wing views on many political subjects. Bradly Manning is a hero; and indeed, the pentagon should not be allowed to murder this most courageous young gay man. He was a high school dropout that was then pressured to join the military and did so in a futile attempt to win the love of his abusive father. Government whistleblowers should be protected.

  11. Deadbeat said on January 22nd, 2011 at 2:25am #

    halifax writes …
    Fellow readers, with respect–I do not consider it relevant to the essential issue contained in this article whether Manning is indeed a “patriot” or a disgruntled, gay soldier. If he did leak documents as described in the article and, as a consequence of this action, is being held in the manner described, is that not the main issue with respect to Manning himself?

    The answer to that question is no! The argument is about the linking MLK with respect to Manning as “following in MLK’s footsteps”. The critique is that there are more constructive ways to bring attention to Manning rather than injecting MLK into the discussion especially as MLK words and deeds have been greatly distorted across the political spectrum.

    With respect to the linking of Dr. King’s speech to this particular context (vs. Manning, who–like all of us–carries a host of complexities and contradictions), I found it a helpful tool to keep my focus on the painful truth of America’s complicity. There is nothing like the eloquent words of a true leader like Dr. King to remind one that the vision of democracy–regardless of the degree to which it has actually manifested to date–is the ruler by which we, as citizens of any country aspiring to be democratic–measure our responsibilities.

    No one is arguing the “eloquence” of King’s words. The argument is the assertion that Manning is “following in MLK’s footsteps”.

    Finally–and here I will reveal my personal orientation to activism as a neuroscientist whose focus is on the science of consciousness evolution–I appreciate any and all information that is disseminated in a form conducive to the workings of our nonlinear, self-regulating, complex, chaotic adaptive brains. It is the very focus on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s seminal speech in this article that fed both my heart and intellect. In my opinion, we must be vigilant in keeping the voices of our true leaders and visionaries ringing in our ears to keep our sights on what it is we are aspiring to accomplish.

    As a neuroscientist I gather you are aware how ENVIRONMENT affects behavior thus I’m sure you consciously took into account how people of color would respond to this linkage. I can assure you my African American comrades do not share your perspectives. This is in light of the fact that while Manning is rotting away in a brig, African American brother and sisters are also rotting away in maximum security prison on mostly for minor drug charges and the “Left” didn’t have rallies to bring attention to their plight.

    As a nonlinear system, the brain can only respond to what it perceives as having already happened–that is, we can’t open a door unless, as far as our brain is concerned, we already have. Most of us, like Manning, are mere mortals who will come and go from this planet having accomplished little or nothing of merit as individuals. It is the visionaries like Dr. King who remind us that democracy is already “here” and therefore it is in accordance with all that is rational and deeply embedded in our essential biology to take our own individual steps in concert with all other members of the organism of humanity in opening that door.

    The above comment is Liberal psychobabble that attempts to callously racially sanitize MLK. IMO I think kzeese since he’s been hanging out with Glen Ford and the Black Agenda Report (BAR) crew should have passed his article their way before letting King’s sentiments overtake him. With some wisdom via the INCLUSION of the perspectives of people of color would have curbed kzeese’s enthusiasm giving him the needed sensitivity to think twice. For example, if kzeese read the article linked below that is published on BAR it may have changed his mind and perhaps if halifax read the same BAR article he may reconsider using neuroscience to sanitize how people of color should react when MLK words are misapplied …

    Black Radical Thought Will Save Us All

    White Left resistance to effective, comradely collaboration with Black Leftists “makes impossible the ‘revolution of social values’ called for by Dr. King.” Whites control far more resources on the Left, especially in media. However, “the general absence of Black intelligence in White media, specifically that which is defined as White Left or Progressive media, inhibits broad social movement building.”

    It doesn’t happen enough but when it does we should revel in the example and perhaps even build from it. The “it” to which I refer is the acceptance of Black intelligence into predominantly White spaces. And regardless of what some may think of interracial exchange the simple fact is that without sustained and serious inclusion of Black knowledge into segments of the White Left there is simply no hope for either or any other community. The general absence of Black intelligence in White media, specifically that which is defined as White Left or Progressive media, inhibits broad social movement building. It prevents those engaged in Black struggle from receiving the necessary support they deserve from White potential allies with greater resources and makes impossible the “revolution of social values” called for by Dr. King from occurring within the dominant White society; a revolution of values without which no greater form of Black American liberation can emerge. We may not like it but without significant changes from within White America the already bleak condition of the Black struggle can only worsen.

    I’m sorry Kevin but your fail to include the Black perspective is why you completely miss the point of the critique.

  12. Deadbeat said on January 22nd, 2011 at 2:38am #

    lichen writes …

    Oh please, how dare anyone touch the legendary image of MLK, a protestant fundamentalist who had right wing views on many political subjects. Bradly Manning is a hero; and indeed, the pentagon should not be allowed to murder this most courageous young gay man. He was a high school dropout that was then pressured to join the military and did so in a futile attempt to win the love of his abusive father. Government whistleblowers should be protected.

    Yeah lichen but let someone critique Jewish Power or bring up racism within the White Gay community and you’ll be singing a different tune — one that is off key.

    How “courageous” Manning is remains to be seen. Why didn’t Manning file for protection as a Contentious Objector remains to be asked? I think in all honesty Manning is young, naive, a victim of circumstance and was probably encouraged by the media hounds at WikiLeaks.

    But Manning is no different IMO from the plethora of African American brothers and sisters rotting away in U.S. prisons. I hardly saw any articles from the Left about the strike organized by the prisoners in Georgia. The government is now targeting those leaders. Where is the attention being given to them by the Left?

    Again this is why kzeese’s article linking Manning to MLK ring hallow to people of color and is more counterproductive than enlightening.

  13. lichen said on January 22nd, 2011 at 6:15pm #

    The sources of wikileaks are 100% anonymous, so no, unlike the pentagon propaganda that you are quoting about how Assange coerced Manning to reveal the data, the truth is that he is quite courageous; he made a bold move in uncovering undeniable evidence of war crimes and the corrupt, elite political system that governs the world. The right wing has not written many articles about the prison riots either, which implicates you.

    It was clear from the beginning that you were making his homosexuality an issue in a very “don’t compare your sin with my skin” way. One day you might realize that there is a sizable black glbt community that is poor and oppressed and not served by your immature exclusionary ideology bound up with straight privelege. And lol, I just can’t stand people talking about “jewish power” which I guess is how you define bringing up antizionist propaganda in places that have absolutely nothing to do with it. But, indeed, embrace right wing martyrs from the civil rights past instead of the supposed ‘black radical left’ that you bring up above.

  14. lichen said on January 22nd, 2011 at 6:22pm #

    “White Left resistance to effective, comradely collaboration with Black Leftists…”

    Lol. Naturally someone so gifted with interpersonal skills, someone that so embodies comradery and effective, clear, honest communication like yourself deserves to make such a critique. Perhaps your imaginary “white left” (it couldn’t be possible that they are in higher numbers of left organizations because of the percentage of overall population in the US?) doesn’t like to be confronted and accused of being racist in an offensive manner at every step of the way; perhaps they would enjoy nonviolent communication, empathy, and common ground a bit more than that? You can write as many radical essays as you want, but since their only intended audience is others on the radical black left, they wont go any further.

  15. hayate said on January 22nd, 2011 at 6:39pm #

    lichen said on January 22nd, 2011 at 6:22pm

    “Lol. Naturally someone so gifted with interpersonal skills, someone that so embodies comradery and effective, clear, honest communication like yourself deserves to make such a critique. Perhaps your imaginary “white left” (it couldn’t be possible that they are in higher numbers of left organizations because of the percentage of overall population in the US?) doesn’t like to be confronted and accused of being racist in an offensive manner at every step of the way; perhaps they would enjoy nonviolent communication, empathy, and common ground a bit more than that? You can write as many radical essays as you want, but since their only intended audience is others on the radical black left, they wont go any further.”

    What I have been wondering for some time now is why Jewish zionists are so prejudiced against black people. I mean not ALL black people are Black Muslims….the #1 group Jewish zionists in the media heap the hate rhetoric upon. What is behind YOUR people’s hatred of black people, lichen?

  16. Deadbeat said on January 22nd, 2011 at 8:08pm #

    Thanks hayate for your comments here. IMO Part of the racism towards Blacks by Jewish Zionist is also linked to the silence by the “Left” about Zionism itself because Blacks and people of color in general do not tolerate racism. This makes Zionists (especially Chomskyites) very nervous for the obvious reasons.

  17. hayate said on January 22nd, 2011 at 8:21pm #

    Cheers, Deadbeat

  18. lichen said on January 22nd, 2011 at 10:07pm #

    I’m not jewish, nor am I religous, nor do I support zionism. Of course it is racist to critique a 1960′s liberal celebrity politician like MLK, but it isn’t homophobic to say the entire gay community (of which deadbeat has no experience or relationship with) is racist. Try again, or just talk to each other. I don’t care much.

  19. Deadbeat said on January 22nd, 2011 at 11:05pm #

    I’m not jewish, nor am I religous, nor do I support zionism. Of course it is racist to critique a 1960′s liberal celebrity politician like MLK, but it isn’t homophobic to say the entire gay community (of which deadbeat has no experience or relationship with) is racist. Try again, or just talk to each other. I don’t care much.

    It is not “homophobic” to identify a real problem within the White gay community and you have every right to speak out against attitudes by African Americans that belittle gays. However your comment here lichen are not designed to provide analysis but is all about exacerbating racial antagonisms. That is the issue of “whiteness” lichen which you’ve excellently illustrated.

  20. jayn0t said on January 23rd, 2011 at 3:31pm #

    Look at this, just out:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/23/palestine-papers-expose-peace-concession

    - Palestinian Authority conceding the settlements on the West Bank to the Jews
    - Palestinian Authority privately told about the coming assault on Gaza in 2008
    - Israel’s proposed ethnic cleansing of Palestinian Israeli citizens
    - The ‘dismissive attitude of US politicians towards Palestinian representatives’ – well, yes, but this is a side effect of the dominant position of Jews re. US politicians!
    - Wikileaks is not in some sense on the side of the Israeli government
    - Deadbeat said (above) “the jury is still out about Wikileaks”. Not any more!

  21. Deadbeat said on January 24th, 2011 at 3:06am #

    - Wikileaks is not in some sense on the side of the Israeli government
    - Deadbeat said (above) “the jury is still out about Wikileaks”. Not any more!

    I noticed that Al Jazerra never mentioned WikiLeaks but The Guardian does. Also from my reading of the articles the leaks are more an embarrassment to the Palestinian Authority than it is to Israel.

    Can you explain Jay how you interpret these leaks.

  22. mary said on January 24th, 2011 at 3:20am #

    Deadbeat I have not heard of any connection between Wikileaks and these ‘Palestine Papers’ as they are being called.

    This is the Guardian’s version of their provenance.

    {http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/23/story-behind-leaked-palestine-papers?intcmp=239}

  23. hayate said on January 24th, 2011 at 4:18am #

    This piece by Kathleen Christison:

    January 19, 2011

    A CounterPunch Special Investigation US was Cheerleader for Massacre Wikileaks Cables on Israel’s Gaza Onslaught

    [http://www.counterpunch.org/christison01192011.html]

    Is about cables wikileaks released to Counterpunch about the Gaza invasion. The cables themselves are here:

    [http://www.counterpunch.org/wikigazacables.html]

    These are likely part of the 1000s of cables Wikileaks passed on to the msm. Initially, Wikileaks gave the guardian, nyt, etc. supposedly all the cables, including a couple of 1000 having to do with Palestine/israel, Assange claimed in recent interviews. He also claimed Wikileaks would be gradually releasing the israel material over the next 6 months.

    Guardian, the nyt, etc. have had these cables for months and have been sitting on them. Now guardian does some stories on them. Is it because Wikileaks has now also given the cables to other media orgs, such as those given to Counterpunch, and guardian wants to be the first to write the stories before the others begin writing articles? Is it because of the fraudulent israeli “investigation” of their Mavi Marmara war crimes? Something else? But the fact remains, guardian sat on the information for months without publishing any of it till now.

  24. hayate said on January 24th, 2011 at 4:23am #

    This is assuming that what guardian is using is in fact some of the cables they received from Wikileaks. If they are something else, then guardian is still sitting on the cables Wikileaks gave them.

  25. jayn0t said on January 24th, 2011 at 6:55am #

    “The leaks are more an embarrassment to the Palestinian Authority than it is to Israel”. It’s true they aren’t an embarrassment to Israel, but what has Israel got to be embarrassed about? Wikileaks isn’t making a moral statement, it’s making a factual one. It’s up to everyone else to draw conclusions about what to do about Jewish power in the world, and that’s what a huge number of people will now do. Kind of like the Protocols. But true.