Our Holocaustic Global Empire: Wars, Famines, Slavery

This worldwide crisis is more devastating than the Great Depression of the 1930s.

– Michel Chossudovsky

Yajnavalkya offered the king a wish. The king chose: to ask questions according to his desire.—

— The Upanishads

For a hundred men who are hacking at the branches of evil, one is digging at the roots.

— Henry David Thoreau

A review of The Global Economic Crisis: The Great Depression of the XXI Century, Michel Chossudovsky and Andrew Gavin Marshall, Editors; Global Research Publishers, Montreal, 2010; 391 pages.

Each of the 16 authors in this collection of contemporary essays and articles about our New-World-Order socio-political-economic mess are digging at the roots of evil; each exposes another layer of lies, frauds, half-truths, myths or cover-ups about the way our global system actually operates.

This is not about your father’s capitalism. The Repugnants, Tea-Partiers and their assorted know-nothings can continue to berate the Demonics, Obama, Pelosi and their own assorted know-nothings for their “Marxist tendencies,” but the plain fact is that capitalism has evolved into something far beyond the dialectical materialism and “surplus value” of 19th and 20th century visionaries and theorists. Given Stalin’s metastasis of socialism, the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1989-1991, and the rapid technoligization of global trading–including futures trading–, the Minotaur in the labyrinths of our nightmares is “financialization”: a beast reaching its tentacles (or central banking system) into every corner of the globe, its “brain” an alphabet soup of noxious acronymous (IMF, BIS, CIA, FAO and countless others) agencies, reducing the laboring masses to feudal serfs on endless treadmills of debt for their housing, health care, transportation—indeed, their very lives.

The 22 articles and essays are written by Chossudovsky and Marshall, as well as Ellen Brown, Richard C. Cook, James Petras, Mike Whitney, Michael Hudson, Tom Burghardt, Peter Dale Scott,Tanya Cariina Hsu, Claudia von Werlhof, Bill Van Auken, Peter Phillips, Shamus Cooke, John Bellamy Foster and Fred Magdoff—names familiar to many, especially to readers of progressive websites like Global Research. The articles are categorized into five parts: “The Global Economic Crisis,” “Global Poverty,” “War, National Security and World Government,” “The Global Monetary System” and “The Shadow Banking System.” Generally, I read the articles from the shorter ones to the longer ones; that worked fine because the “big picture” that emerges is not so much about an inevitable sequencing or unfolding of events as it is about our contemporary world of fibrous connections that enfold, squeeze and strangle the general population of the planet. The puzzle pieces fall into place with each article.

“Famines in the age of globalization are the result of policy,” Chossudovsky writes in his essay on global poverty. The key point, of course, here and elsewhere in this book, is that none of the colossal failures of our post-Cold War world, including “failed states,” “rogue states,” the Global War on Terrorism, the devastations wrought in Iraq and Afghanistan, bank failures and bailouts, rising poverty and debt, the shrinking middle classes, assaults on union power, the consolidation of wealth—none of it “just happened.” The fact is, Chossudovsky demonstrates, that “world agriculture has for the first time in history the capacity to satisfy the food requirements of the entire planet, yet the very nature of the global market system prevents this from occurring.” Giant firms like Cargill, Archer Daniels Midland and Monsanto “control the markets for grain, farm inputs, seeds and processed foods.” They set market prices through the New York and Chicago mercantile exchange—where the name of the game is “leverage” through “futures” trading of options, derivatives, etc. Control food, fuel and water prices, and a consortium of interests can control the world. For example: “US margin rules of the government’s Commodity Futures Trading Commission allow speculators to buy a crude oil futures contract on the Nymex by having to pay only 6% of the value of the contract. At today’s price of $128 per barrel, that means a futures trader only has to put up about $8 for every barrel. … This extreme “leverage” of 16 to 1 helps drive prices to wildly unrealistic levels and offset bank losses in sub-prime and other disasters at the expense of the overall population.”

While the architectonics of our New World Order solidified and rigidified during and after the Cold War, with the application of new communications technologies fostering international trade, finance and speculation, the brick and mortar have long been part of the imperial design. Thus, in Gavin Marshall’s essay on “Central Banking: Managing the Global Political Economy,” we find this extraordinary quote by Lincoln:

I have two great enemies, the Southern Army in front of me, and the bankers in the rear. Of the two, the one at my rear is my greatest foe [as]… corporations have been enthroned, and an era of corruption… will follow. The money power will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until the wealth is aggregated in the hands of a few, and the Republic is destroyed.

How many times have you heard that compared to “The Gettysberg Address”?

That system of privately owned, national” or “central banks,” bewailed by our prescient 16th president, has created, and certainly exacerbated, many of the crises, disasters and holocaustic wars of the modern era. Marshall avers: “the most vital and powerful force within the capitalist global political economy: the central banking system… [manages] capitalism—controlling the credit and debt of both government and industry.” That management, of course, has become especially potent since the creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913, with its power to print “fiat” paper money, determine fractional reserve rates for banks within the US, override regulatory policies of the Treasury Department and Congress, and interlock with central banks in other nations to control “capitalism for the few and at the expense of the many.” Marshall notes, “Any notion of a “free market” must be dispelled.

While the Tea Partiers and most other sentient humans in the developed countries viscerally feel the dissolution of “democracy,” few can understand the complex processes by which they have been disenfranchised, as the world’s elite, political class moves towards global governance, enforced by the militarization and segmentation of the world’s economy, and underscored by the fragmentation and destruction of the nation-state. In “The Tower of Basel: Secretive Plan to Create a Global Central Bank,” Ellen Brown quotes a G-20 Communique from London, April 2, 2009:

We are committed to take all necessary actions to restore the normal flow of credit through the financial system and ensure the soundness of systemically important institutions, implementing our policies in line with the agreed G20 framework for restoring lending and repairing the financial sector.

I wonder how many of those good-scout Americans, eager to evince their “patriotism” by voting in the mid-term elections or in presidential elections, have any idea what on earth this “G20 framework,” which over-arches their lives–, have any idea what on earth it means? Of, for that matter, what is this “Tower of Basel,” the Bank for International Settlements, founded in 1930 in Basel Switzerland, and why is it called the “most exclusive, secretive, and powerful supranational club in the world”? Ms. Brown quotes Dr. Carroll Quigley (whose book, Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time [1966], is quoted by other authors in this collection):

The powers of financial capitalism had… nothing less [as their aim] than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world’s central banks which were themselves private corporations.

The key to their success, as Brown nods to Quigley, would be that “international bankers would control and manipulate the money system of a nation while letting it appear to be controlled by the government.” Ms. Brown notes here Mayer Rothschild’s infamous quote: “Allow me to issue and control a nation’s currency, and I care not who makes its laws.”

Those laws are increasingly enforced by a militarized global state under the direction of the US-Nato-Israel axis. According to Chossudovsky:

Economic conquest is an integral part of America’s military adventure. The US military and intelligence apparatus consults with Wall Street and the Texas oil giants. Conversely, the IMF and the World Bank, which have a mandate to supervise macroeconomic reform in developing countries, are in liaison with the US state Department and Petagon. … We are looking at an integrated process involving conquest through outright military operations… and the destabilization and conquest of sovereign countries. …

Thus we see our “color revolutions” in former Soviet republics, the deliberate wreckage of national economies in Africa, Latin America and Asia. In the US-NATO-Israel alliance we perceive “the militarization of a region extending from the tip of the Arabian peninsula to the Caspian Sea, and from the Eastern Mediterranean to the Chinese border.” A region encompassing “approximately sixty percent of the world’s reserves of oil and natural gas.” The “military-industrial” complex, still nascent enough for Eisenhower’s trenchant warning, now reigns supreme: “The development and production of advanced weapons systems, the construction of military bases, the recruitment of troops to serve in the war theater and the outsourcing of contracts to mercenary companies are an integral part of the US economy.”

So… what to do?

Some wag critic once remarked that to describe everything that was in Hamlet, one would simply have to re-write Hamlet word for word and hand it to the inquiring student. So it is with this rich collection of essays about our modern, entangled world. In this review, I’ve barely touched upon the excellent work of most of the authors in the book: Richard C. Cook on “Democratizing the Money System”; Mike Whitney on “Securitization: the Biggest Rip-off Ever”; Peter Phillips on “Poverty and Social Inequality”; Michael Hudson, Tom Burghardt, Bill Van Auken and Peter Dale Scott writing on the interconnections of “War, National Security and World Government”; Tanya Cariina Hsu, John Bellamy Foster, Fred Magdoff, James Petras, Claudia von Werlhof and Shamus Cooke writing on the “Death of the American Empire,” “Financial Implosion,” “Depression,” “Globalization and Neoliberalism,” etc.

These authors do not pretend to have all the answers, but they do pose some mighty questions about the way our global system has been working and not working for several decades, and even centuries. Posing those questions in a book of this kind by a highly respected progressive press is an invaluable service to all those who would like to understand our world—and change it for the better.

In The Upanishads, it is written: “When Janaka, king of the Videhas, and Yajnavalkya debated together at the offering of the holy fire, Yajnavalkya offered the king a wish. The king chose: to ask questions according to his desire.” It may seem a simple wish, but it is in fact a profound one at any time, and particularly so in our age of media/government/corporate disinformation and war-generating distortions about “weapons of mass destruction,” false-flag operations, etc.

Theories about the sustainability of systems remind us of the essentiality of efficiency and resilience. With its wars, engineered famines and economic collapses our present system has proven itself highly inefficient for most of the seven billion humans now existing or subsisting on the planet. Nor, with the growing awareness of its weaknesses, vulnerabilities, and brutal repressions, is it likely to prove resilient in the longer term. But…, then again, it is entrenched and super-powerful! Systems theories also remind us that the crucial variables upon which efficiency and resilience rely are diversification and interconnectivity. Our world system has become less and less diversified, more and more monetized and consolidated for the sake of the top 1-10 percent of the world’s population. And while the Internet offers the prospect of increased interconnectivity for the citizens of this planet, it also has been hijacked and overridden by the control freaks, disinformation-disseminators and surveillance-monitors. We have militarized space, and fear and ignorance have hardened the human heart and mind.

We will have to learn how to swim in the quicksand. In this book there are signals for doing so… and for extrication.

Gary Corseri's work has appeared at Dissident Voice, Common Dreams, CounterPunch, the New York Times, Village Voice and hundreds of other venues. His dramas have been produced on PBS-Atlanta and he has performed his work at the Carter Presidential Library and Museum. His books include novels and poetry collections. He can be reached at: gary_corseri@comcast.net. Read other articles by Gary.

18 comments on this article so far ...

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  1. PatrickSMcNally said on October 26th, 2010 at 11:54am #

    > in Gavin Marshall’s essay on “Central Banking: Managing the Global Political Economy,” we find this extraordinary quote by Lincoln

    That’s a bogus quote from wayback. Pick up a copy of THEY NEVER SAID IT by Paul Boller & John George.

  2. PatrickSMcNally said on October 26th, 2010 at 11:58am #

    > Ms. Brown notes here Mayer Rothschild’s infamous quote: “Allow me to issue and control a nation’s currency, and I care not who makes its laws.”

    This one is also of doubtful origins. It may have been invented by Willian Dudley Pelley’s Silver Shirts, since that seems to be where it first became notable. But no one has ever reported any actual historical sources for this quote.

  3. teafoe2 said on October 26th, 2010 at 12:14pm #

    >…how to swim in the quicksand. In this book there are signals for doing so… and for extrication.<

  4. teafoe2 said on October 26th, 2010 at 12:18pm #

    I for one would like to see whatever “signals” answering this job description are available. How about a quick summary of the key ones?

  5. Gary S. Corseri said on October 26th, 2010 at 12:47pm #

    Teafoe,

    Thanks.

    In the book you can check out Richard C. Cook’s essay on “Democratizing the Monetary System” for what amounts to an Economic Bill of Rights.

    Also, think about what points you would want in an Economic Bill of Rights and start organizing others to effect some real “change we can believe in” by revolutionizing our Constitution so that it is structured to promote economic, as well as political, “liberty” and responsibilities.

    There are various signals in the book which I would confound by short-handing or short-listing them. Though, of course, if you’d like to write a review of the book, highlighting your own predilections for action, feel free to do so; I’ll look forward to reading it.

  6. shabnam said on October 26th, 2010 at 1:14pm #

    I agree with the following statement:

    {The key point, of course, here and elsewhere in this book, is that none of the colossal failures of our post-Cold War world, including “failed states,” “rogue states,” the Global War on Terrorism, the devastations wrought in Iraq and Afghanistan, bank failures and bailouts, rising poverty and debt, the shrinking middle classes, assaults on union power, the consolidation of wealth—none of it “just happened.”}

    Our world has been shaped by the Jewish plutocracy, Rothchild family and its extension, since Nepolian defeat at Waterloo in 1815.
    {This extreme “leverage” of 16 to 1 helps drive prices to wildly unrealistic levels and offset bank losses in sub-prime and other disasters at the expense of the overall population.”}

    The “New World Order” started long time ago designed by the Jewish Plutocracy, Rothchild family and its extension to this day. They have made connection with elites around the world including in Islamic countries.
    Joan Veon writes:
    {Napoleon who really enriched Mayer Amshel Bauer who by that time had changed his name to Rothschild. Napoleon was determined to rid Europe of Prince William and so, as the prince fled Napoleon, he entrusted Rothschild with $3M. His son, Nathan, who established banking interests in England, invested this money in “gold from the East India Company, knowing that it would be needed for Wellington’s peninsula campaign.” On the temporarily stolen money, N. Rothschild made four profits before he returned it to the Prince with interest: (1) on the sale of Wellington’s bonds which he bought at 50 cents on the dollar and collected at par, (2) on the sale of gold to Wellington, (3) on its repurchase, and (4) then selling it to Portugal.}

    Furthermore, Rothschilds became the richest family in Europe through DECEPTION, after Napoleon was defeated by the British at Waterloo where News reached Rothschild before anyone else, because Rothschilds had developed a method to get the News earlier than others, because time was MONEY.
    This method was a network of secret routes and fast couriers, including, pigeons, it was their intelligence system that allowed Nathan in England to provide Napoleon with important information on how the war with Wellington was going.

    After he learned that Wellington had won the war with Napoleon, Nathan stood at his post and without any expression on his face began to direct his traders to sell.
    Then, right before the market closed, when prices had hit rock bottom, Rothschild directed his agents to purchase all the bonds for pennies on the dollar. He had known more than they did.

    Allow me to say, Mr. Corseri that I agree with the following famous quote:
    {The key to their success, as Brown nods to Quigley, would be that “international bankers would control and manipulate the money system of a nation while letting it appear to be controlled by the government.” Ms. Brown notes here Mayer Rothschild’s infamous quote: “Allow me to issue and control a nation’s currency and I care not who makes its laws.”}

    It was Rothchilds who controlled British Empire by controlling the supply of money. It is not a secrect. It is known to many that Nathan Rothschild told the world :

    {I care not what puppet is placed upon the throne of England to rule the Empire on which the sun never sets. The man who controls Britain’s money supply controls the British Empire, and I control the British money supply. }

    Thank you Mr. Corseri for your work.

  7. ajohnstone said on October 26th, 2010 at 2:18pm #

    I find myself taking issue with the statement that “”Chossudovsky demonstrates, that “world agriculture has for the first time in history the capacity to satisfy the food requirements of the entire planet, yet the very nature of the global market system prevents this from occurring…Famines in the age of globalization are the result of policy”

    The fact is that for several decades the world’s capacity to produce food has far exceeded the entire human population’s need for nourishment has been well known and documented . The problem has been much more fundamental than Chossuduvsky tries to present it. It is to do with the whole basis of capitalism. If you’ve got no money, or not enough money, you’re not part of the market. Food and farming policy has very little to do with meeting human needs, guaranteeing food security, providing high and consistent levels of nutrition and food safety. It’s all about profit: squeezing the maximum financial yield out of every link in the food chain to benefit a tiny number.This is no defence of the financial speculators but reminding ourselves that it is the system of buying and selling that results in food shortages. The poor simply do not constitute a market — there is no profit to be made out of selling food to the destitute, or from growing food for them. If the one dollar a day will not stretch to buying food, then too bad. Countries supposedly in the grip of famine hardly ever have an absolute food shortage, it’s just that the food available is sold to those who can afford to buy it or exported for consumption elsewhere.

    The answer to the problems that global capitalism has engendered is not another policy that would still leave intact the basic structures and mechanisms of capitalism. Capitalism operates according to the rules of “no profit, no production” and “can’t pay, can’t have” and, as the world market system, is what is responsible for the desperate plight of most of the world’s population. Before anything lasting and constructive can be done about this, capitalism has to go. It is something much more far-reaching that is required , a rapid and radical change in the basis of world society that will make the Earth’s resources the common heritage of all humanity.
    Too many try to control capitalism for the benefit of humanity, to humanise it. Like all reformers, they limit themselves to attacking features which they do not like and fail to realise that those features are integral to capitalism. What they are for is a more regulated capitalism. They merely want governments to intervene to try to control capitalism, to suppress its worst excesses.

  8. Deadbeat said on October 26th, 2010 at 2:56pm #

    Totally agree with ajohnstone. This is what the “Liberals” refuse to recognize and are the most responsible for fostering and maintaining this ignorance about Capitalism.

    Listen to Arianna Huffington blather on about “third world America” and in the same breath supports and defends Capitalism. It very profitable of her to write about the deleterious effects of Capitalism all the while making appearances hawking her book about about the dwindling “middle class”.

    And their solution? … “jobs, jobs, jobs”

    Yet none of them address the debt issue and the ruin credit ratings of these workers. Oh yes — all that shovel-ready crap. Yeah tell that to an laid-off over 50 former office worker with a bad back and tell her to get out there with a pick axe.

    Capitalism has hit the fan alright and the sooner we realize this the better.

  9. teafoe2 said on October 26th, 2010 at 3:01pm #

    Gary Corseri wrote: >Also, think about what points you would want in an Economic Bill of Rights and start organizing others to effect some real “change we can believe in” by revolutionizing our Constitution so that it is structured to promote economic, as well as political, “liberty” and responsibilities.<

    Sorry, if this is a sample of the kind of "signals" contained in the book, I pass. Tom Hayden and his Campaign for Economic Democracy drew up a beautiful fantasy blueprint decades ago; many others have offered similar pie-in-the-sky formulas. The problem is always the same: no power to implement. No power to even get a hearing by the general public.

    I like many others had a lot of hopes that the BDS campaign would provide a way to get a hearing for something other than Obama-style ZioImperialist propaganda, but the power of the Thought Police is so pervasive that even Food Coop boards are afraid even to listen to presentations by BDS advocates.

    The Dumbo-Rethug duopoly is more successful than ever at preventing the public from hearing from other candidates. And you are proposing that we organize a movement to amend the Constitution? Sorry, will never get off the ground.

    The portrait you have presented of the present scale and structure of the global Combine is in my view very descriptive and accurate except that it tends to minimize the Zionism Factor. Yes, Israel is mentioned, but only very briefly, and the Zionist Fifth Column in the US not at all. So the picture presented, while containing a wealth of solid information, winds up diverting attention from what should be the key focus.

    But the analyis presented is far superior to the remedies suggested, if your notion of an "Economic Bill of Rights" is representative of those in the book.

    We don't need any more Liberal-type exercises in tail-chasing. We need something new and creative.

    Antonio Gramisci found himself facing a similar historical dilemma; he came up with some ideas quite different from those current in the "left" of his time… but his ideas now are part of the ZioImperialist toolkit by which any opposition is short-circuited. But he did manage to "think outside the box" of the Left Conventional Wisdom.

    What we need now is somebody with the ability to think exponentially FARTHER outside our contemporary mental cul-de-sac.

  10. shabnam said on October 26th, 2010 at 3:21pm #

    Arianna Huffington is a fraud. She follows the power, be far right or otherwise. At one time she supported Gingrich, later she change the course and supported Obama. Today, I think she supports no one except herself. She lately said: Obama’s mistake is to pass the health care bill before creating Jobs. It is like to say we need jobs with no education to gain skill. If people are not healthy, then they cannot work when jobs are available or not.

  11. Don Hawkins said on October 26th, 2010 at 3:34pm #

    Trouble…
    Trouble, trouble, trouble, trouble
    Trouble been doggin’ my soul since the day I was born
    Worry…
    Worry, worry, worry, worry
    Worry just will not seem to leave my mind alone

    Hay T42 can you drive a dump truck am thinking of going into the shit hauling business. Now I got to warn you the dump truck has a bad dump switch act’s up ever now and then. I have had it looked at by some of the best still a mystery it’s almost like the dump has a mind of it’s own. Anyway trying to think of a slogan how about, “Be on our shit list”. I know outside the dump. Maybe just sell shoes instead.

  12. Don Hawkins said on October 26th, 2010 at 4:00pm #

    http://www.intellicast.com/National/Surface/Current.aspx

    PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT

    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DULUTH MN

    1055 AM CDT TUE OCT 26 2010

    …MINNESOTA ALL TIME LOWEST PRESSURE RECORD BROKEN THIS MORNING…

    …PRESSURE IS STILL FALLING AND WILL CONTINUE INTO THE AFTERNOON…

    REMEMBER THAT THIS INFORMATION IS PRELIMINARY. THE LOW IS STILL

    STRENGTHENING SO THE VALUES LISTED BELOW ARE LIKELY TO CHANGE.

    AN UNUSUALLY INTENSE LOW WAS AFFECTING THE STATE OF MINNESOTA THIS

    MORNING. AT 1013 AM CDT…THE AUTOMATED WEATHER OBSERVING SYSTEM AT

    AITKIN MINNESOTA RECORDED A 962.3 MILLIBAR /28.42 INCHES/ PRESSURE.

    THIS BREAKS THE ALL TIME MINNESOTA STATE RECORD FOR THE LOWEST

    OBSERVED PRESSURE.

    THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 962.6 MB SET ON NOVEMBER 10 1998 AT ALBERT

    LEA AND AUSTIN IN SOUTHERN MINNESOTA.

    IT SHOULD ALSO BE NOTED THAT DULUTH BROKE THEIR PRESSURE RECORD. AS

    OF 1028 AM…THE PRESSURE AT DULUTH WAS 962.9 MILLIBARS /28.44

    INCHES/. THIS BREAKS THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 964.3 MILLIBARS WHICH

    OCCURRED ON NOVEMBER 10 1998.

    PRESSURE RECORDS AT INTERNATIONAL FALLS WERE ONLY AVAILABLE BACK TO

    1948. THE LOWEST PRESSURE PREVIOUSLY AT THAT LOCATION WAS 971.9

    MILLIBARS ON OCTOBER 10 1949. THE PRESSURE AS OF 1024 AM WAS 967.4

    MILLIBARS /28.57 INCHES/. THEREFORE…INTERNATIONAL FALLS ALSO BROKE

    THEIR PRESSURE RECORD.

    THE LOW CONTINUES TO DEEPEN AND THE PRESSURE WILL LIKELY CONTINUE TO

    FALL. THEREFORE…THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND WILL BE UPDATED. NWS

    PEOPLE OF EARTH WE ARE IN DEEP DO DO.

  13. Rehmat said on October 26th, 2010 at 6:41pm #

    “Well, it’s a trick, we always use it. When from Europe somebody is criticizing Israel then we bring up the holocaust. When in this country US) people are criticizing Israel then they are antisemitic. And the organization (Israel Lobby) is very strong and has lot of money. And the ties between Israel and american estab- Jewish establishment are very strong – and they are strong in this country as you know. And they have power which is ok.” – Former Israeli cabinet minister, Shulamit Aloni (born 1928), during her August 14, 2002 interview with Amy Goodman of Democracy Now!

    http://rehmat1.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/thou-shalt-not-discuss-holocaust/

  14. Mulga Mumblebrain said on October 27th, 2010 at 3:03am #

    Capitalism has been a means to enrich the few, at the expense of the many, since its inception. On the psychic and spiritual levels it is the manifestation of extreme egotism and commensurate hatred and contempt for the lives of Others, whether human or non-human. The birth of capitalism was power-charged by the export of vast quantities of silver from the New World, obtained from places like Potosi in Bolivia, where, after they had exterminated the local indigenous population, the European masters imported millions of African slaves. Millions died of over-work in the high altitudes, or of mercury poisoning. Naturally, there are no Memorials or Museums to the victims of this Holocaust, the victims not being ‘Chosen’. I dare say that a death by Zyklon B or bullet at least has the very small advantage of being mercilessly quick in comparison.
    The history of capitalism has always been the history of genocide, of class hatred, of misogyny and of hyper-exploitation to feed the insatiable avarice of a tiny elite. The various efforts to replace capitalism with a more humane, just and sustainable system, which all drew on religious traditions, that, invariably, with one crucial exception, that of Judaism, rejected usury and double-dealing (the bedrocks of capitalist parasitism) have all failed, mostly because of the murderous resistance capitalists mount to any threat to their precious ‘assets’.
    This failure once just signalled a future of continuing misery for the mass of humanity, and vast riches but spiritual damnation for the Masters. That calculus has, now, changed, irrevocably, as capitalism’s neoplastic drive for perpetual growth destroys the planet’s life-sustaining biospheres and exhausts the easily harvested resource riches, particularly of energy, on which the Industrial Age was based. I’m convinced it is already too late, even if tomorrow the Koch Brothers, Murdoch, and all the other pathocrats were to suddenly develop moral conscience above that of a leech, and use their billions of ill-gotten wealth for good instead of diabolical evil in twisting minds and promulgating untruth.
    However, let us assume that I am wrong, as I frequently, if not invariably am, due to an excess of realism-oh dear, I mean pessimism- and there is yet time to reverse ecological destruction, resource depletion and growing, US and Zionazi-led, global political tension. If humanity is to be spared, at best an era of unprecedented bloodletting, at worst the collapse of human civilization and possible species extinction, then capitalism must go. Root and branch, with the supreme capitalist criminals suffering just and condign punishment for crimes that make the Nazis look like babes in arms.
    Of course, the chances of this approximate to zero. Instead we will get more mass brainwashing, where business parasites of the grisliest kind are paraded as paragons (by the even more loathsome sycophants of the business-owned media) and all the multitudinous crises are dismissed as ‘conspiracies’ by the capitalists’ gigantic denialist industry. More ‘divide and rule’ tactics such as that of the Tea Party and its intellectually challenged ‘Mad Hatters’ who see those even poorer that themselves as their enemies, not the business plutocrats that they have been trained to adore, in the truly moronic belief that they, too, one day, might be ‘rich’.
    In fact we have the unbearable, exquisite, privilege of being alive at the time where our supposedly ‘sapient’ species must decide between a short, miserable, life as serfs and debt-peons, followed by mass death through famine and war, ending, probably, in just that ‘Apocalypse’ so longed for by the religious psychopaths of the various monotheisms, or a future where we live up to our, so-far, ludicrous self-description of ‘Homo sapiens sapiens’-the repetition no doubt there for added comic effect. But to survive capitalism means that the capitalists must go, preferably peacefully, but, I mean, can you imagine that?
    Above all else I think that the gravest danger is the siren song of ‘reform’, the crazy notion that an intrinsically anti-human, anti-life, system like capitalism, that gives the highest value to the dead stuff of money, over and above life in all its forms, can be ‘reformed’. If you need proof, just look at the depressing fiasco of ‘social democracy’, that sold out everywhere and always to the Bosses, in return for a few scraps from the high table for the willing and duplicitous ilk of Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Bob Hawke,Kevin Rudd et al. Once their utility was over,they have been replaced by a new type, even more loathsomely complicit and accommodating, like the truly despicable fraud Obama, and his Antipodean clones, Rudd and Gillard. History is repeating, but it has gone far beyond farce into the realm of psychotic derangement and the living out of some dreadful death wish.

  15. Don Hawkins said on October 27th, 2010 at 5:57am #

    Mulga so far you are correct. Even if we stopped burning fossil fuel’s today well thirty years is a nice round number. How many of those thirty years will the Earth warm good question either way it’s going to get ruff. Here in the States how many of the people we see on TV weather it be so called policy makers or shakers and movers know this little fact? Another good question and that includes media and Phil put it well.
    It has long been apparent: Those benefiting from the present system have become so ruthlessly driven that they have become bereft of the ability to reflect on their own actions. Apropos, we’ve witnessed the rise of the telegenic undead known as the corporate media. Do not look to these aggregations of preening narcissists to report the truth of our condition: After all, a mirror cannot reflect the image of a vampire. A vampire is empty to the core; therefore, there is nothing to reflect. Regarding this contemporary class of vampiric careerists who haunt the electronic mass media, there is no one there beneath the coiffure of immaculate hair. Phil

    Most am sure have a good idea some know it well as to put out the bullshit as they do first you probably need to know the truth that yes not many hear. So far any plan’s for what we can’t slow no and so it goes.

  16. MylesH said on October 27th, 2010 at 5:18pm #

    Thanks for the review, Gary.
    I’ll look into this book.

  17. Gary S. Corseri said on October 27th, 2010 at 7:16pm #

    BTW, Don, nice writing:

    “Those benefiting from the present system have become so ruthlessly driven that they have become bereft of the ability to reflect on their own actions. Apropos, we’ve witnessed the rise of the telegenic undead known as the corporate media. Do not look to these aggregations of preening narcissists to report the truth of our condition: After all, a mirror cannot reflect the image of a vampire.”

    Is that Rockstroh’s work?

  18. Don Hawkins said on October 28th, 2010 at 5:04pm #

    Who else! We are all philosopher’s now.