More on Washington’s Failed Ecuadorean Coup Attempt

For nearly two centuries, America dismissively called Latin America its “backyard,” the 1823 Monroe Doctrine asserting a declaration of regional dominance, stating:

….as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers….we should consider any attempt on their part to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and safety…. (impossible to) behold… with indifference.

Thereafter, it was all downhill against Mexico, Nicaragua, Cuba, Panama, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Chile, Grenada, Venezuela, and at one time or another, practically all other parts of the Americas, directly or indirectly.

In 1905, in fact, President Theodore Roosevelt declared Washington to be “the policeman” of the Caribbean and Central America, and by implication, the entire hemisphere. To date, nothing has changed, Ecuador just the latest targeted nation, an earlier article explaining the failed coup attempt, accessed here.

On September 30, Ecuador’s President Raphael Correa was targeted. First elected in November 2006 with a 58% majority, he was easily reelected in April 2009 with a 55% majority against seven challengers. His current term runs until August 10, 2013, and will extend until 2017 with another electoral victory.

Yet Ecuador’s volatile history is now in focus. The country’s eighth president in 14 years, Correa’s easily the most popular, though less so after earlier imposing austerity measures. Pro-business ones also, including policies favoring oil, mining, and agribusiness interests at the expense of local communities and environmental considerations.

They’re practiced despite Ecuador’s new 2008 Constitution, recognizing and guaranteeing indigenous peoples’ rights, and a mandate to “preserve and promote their management of biodiversity and their natural environment,” among other populist provisions, including the “rights of nature.”

As a result, indigenous groups like the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE) and Confederation of Peoples of Kichwa Nationality (ECUARUNARI) criticized him, including recently saying:

While the government has dedicated itself exclusively to attacking and delegitimizing organized sectors like the indigenous movement, workers’ unions, etc., it hasn’t weakened in the least the structures of power of the right, or those within the state apparatus.

After the failed September 30 coup, Quito’s Regional Advisory Group on Human Rights urged Correa to renew support for his base, saying:

(W)e call upon the national government to set aside its arrogant attitude that is isolating it from the social bases. Together we can build a country with dignity, peace and sovereignty, in which dialogue with social sectors in a daily activity that guides our path toward a country distanced from extractive polices and dependence on a development model based on the destruction of nature.

Given his close call, it remains to be seen if he’s listening, though Washington and internal hard liners will try again if he goes too far. James Petras explains that they don’t oppose his domestic policies, mainly his “ties with US arch enemy Chavez and ALBA,” the Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas WTO/NAFTA alternative endorsing pro-South trade principles, ones Washington strongly opposes as well as Correa’s decision to close the US Manta airbase.

As a result, Pentagon and CIA operatives, in league with Ecuadorean hard-liners, want Correa ousted, the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and USAID financing opposition groups and political parties to topple him. Correa knows it, saying on September 30 that the:

attempt at destabilization is the result of a strategy that has been brewing for quite some time. A barrage of messages and misinformation have been given to the National Police, which today has been realized through violent actions from a conspiracy attempt.

He accused former right wing president, Lucio Gutierrez, of inciting violence and supporting rogue police and military plotters. A former army colonel, Gutierrez co-led a 2000 coup, then was ousted by a 2005 popular uprising.

Himself victimized by an aborted two-day 2002 coup and fearing another attempt, Hugo Chavez condemned US imperialism, saying: “The Yankee extreme right is trying now, through arms and violence, to retake control of the continent,” having ousted Manuel Zelaya in Honduras in June 2009 and Jean-Bertrand Aristide in February 2004.

In addition, Washington tipped its hand earlier, the State Department calling Ecuador “difficult to do business in,” a Investment Climate Statement stating:

Ecuador can be a difficult place in which to do business…. There are restrictions or limitations on private investment in many sectors that apply equally to domestic and foreign investors… .A 2006 hydrocarbons law imposed new conditions in the petroleum sector that have been problematic for many companies, complicated by a 2007 decree that imposed additional restrictions. A 2008 mining mandate stalled mining activity, and a new Mining Law is expected in early 2009. Negotiations for a free trade agreement between the United States and Ecuador, which would have included investment decisions, stopped in 2006. The current Government of Ecuador has not expressed interest in restarting negotiations.

In December 2008, Correa (a University of Illinois economics PhD) also alienated international lending agencies and foreign bond holders by halting payments on billions of dollars of debt, calling them “illegal (and) illegitimate,” at the time saying:

I have given the order that interest payments not be made. The country is in default. I couldn’t allow the continued payment of a debt that by all measures is immoral and illegitimate. It is now time to bring in justice and dignity.

He also angered Israel by sponsoring an Organization of American States (OAS) resolution last June, condemning the IDF’s Gaza Flotilla attack, leaving some analysts to suspect Mossad wanted him ousted and may have been involved in the attempt.

In 2005, Voltairenet.org quoted Alexis Ponce, Ecuador’s Permanent Assembly for Human Rights (APDH) speaker, saying:

The Mossad trained Ecuadorean police in torture techniques between 1986 and 1994. The Israeli secret services gave technical support to the tyranny that stained Ecuador with blood. The police corps received advanced training by Israeli agents to torture and to force those who opposed the tyranny to speak. The Israeli agents transmitted their knowledge about the numerous techniques used to torture people. They are criminals! Hundreds of people disappeared during those dark years.

Mossad agents have long operated in Ecuador, covertly through Israel’s Quito embassy and perhaps throughout in the country, like in so many others.

In addition, Israel maintains business ties with Ecuador, having sold 26 Kfir combat planes and reportedly Python-3 air-to-air missiles in 1997. Afterward, its technicians and trainers provided support and perhaps continues to do so. Further, in 2009, Israel’s On Track Innovations contracted with Ecuador’s Central Registry Office to provide an electronic biometric-based electronic identification card system.

A Final Comment

America’s major media largely downplayed the coup plot, broadcasters and cable channels especially saying little on September 30, then practically nothing by way of follow-up.

On October 4, in her weekly Wall Street Journal America’s column, Mary O’Grady headlined, “What Really Happened in Ecuador,” saying:

Eyewitnesses deny police kidnapped the president, and there’s no evidence a coup was in the making.

O’Grady, of course, is a notorious liar, her columns a truth-free zone, her extremism and anti-populist vitriol unsurpassed in print media — precisely the “journalistic” attributes Rupert Murdoch values and features daily on Journal op-ed pages, his other publications, and Fox News, straight unabashed disinformation, devoid of truth.

According to O’Grady, Correa’s presidential powers were never threatened, nor did tear gas fumes deter him from “walking across the street to the hospital, his notorious macho dignity obviously wounded.”

In fact, he was overcome by exploding tear gas, AFP, among other news services, saying “he was taken out by stretcher to the nearby hospital,” then “was unable to leave, surrounded by hostile police as clashes broke out in the streets while rebels stormed Congress and seized the main international airport for hours.”

Clearly, it was a coup attempt. Outside America, Murdoch publications, and O’Grady’s column, it’s widely acknowledged. Even New York Times columnist, Simon Romero, reported the following in his October 3 article, titled, “Debate Over Meaning of Standoff in Ecuador:”

– Correa “had been holed up on the third floor of the police hospital here for more than 10 hours after being assaulted by….rebellious police officers….This Andean nation was on tenterhooks;”

– hospital staff “put a helmet on Mr. Correa;” electricity in parts of the hospital went down;

– “an intense exchange of bullets” took place; “five men were shot dead,” dozens more wounded;

– “the president’s armored Nissan sport utility vehicle showed bullet damage, including a shot to the windshield;”

– police “prevented a helicopter from landing” and blocked escape routes;

– Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino was wounded leaving the hospital, his head bleeding;

– “Inside the hospital, doctors, nurses, patients and journalists lay on the floor, hoping to avoid getting shot;”

– “As Mr. Correa’s SUV drove away,” it was attacked by a volley of gunfire, a “uniformed member of (his) security team” shot dead “as he trotted alongside the vehicle;” and,

– the bloodbath outside the hospital continued, police shouting “Kill the chuspangos,” slang for military men before gunfire subsided.

Nonetheless, O’Grady continued, saying:

Mr. Correa had little trouble managing the story. In the morning he closed down independent television reporting, limiting Ecuadoreans to his version of the day’s events.

In fact, Ecuador’s Constitution guarantees press freedom, short of criminally committing defamation, slander, or insurrection advocacy. Nonetheless, the corporate dominated media remains largely combative, Correa calling them “trash talking,” “liars,” unethical,” and “political actors who are trying to oppose the revolutionary government.”

The television Teleamazonas network has been especially harsh, regulators ordering it off air for three days last December for “incit(ing) public disorder.” Earlier, it violated Article 58 of the Broadcasting Law that prohibits airing “news based on unfounded allegations that could produce social unrest.” Several times it was fined nominal amounts, then suspended for repeat violations. After the attempted coup, it again incurred a three-day suspension for inflammatory reporting. However, Correa insists he’s committed to press freedom, provided constitutional and broadcast laws are observed, what all democratic states require.

Nonetheless, O’Grady concluded, saying:

One thing is certain: Mr. Correa is not going to let the crisis go to waste. Since Thursday he has been seizing the airwaves to broadcast his version of the narrative, which implicates his political opponents in what increasingly looks like a coup that never happened.

In fact, it did. Independent reports and many others confirmed it. Ecuador’s media are required to give the president (and other government officials) free air time, and he’s entitled to denounce dark force attempts to oust him. This time, Washington’s fingerprints are again visible, and though unsuccessful, Correa can no means rest, not with actors like O’Grady around, vilifying less than hard right leaders, stopping just short of endorsing their ouster.

Stephen Lendman wrote How Wall Street Fleeces America: Privatized Banking, Government Collusion and Class War. Contact him at: lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net. Also visit his blog site and listen to The Global Research News Hour on RepublicBroadcasting.org Mondays from 11AM-1PM US Central time for cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests. All programs are archived for easy listening. Read other articles by Stephen.

9 comments on this article so far ...

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  1. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 8:07am #

    Decent report. Time to close the israeli and american embassies on Ecuador and prosecute their quislings there.

  2. MichaelKenny said on October 5th, 2010 at 9:46am #

    It is a most encouraging sign of just how deeply the American Empire is in trouble that a street disturbance during a demonstration against austerity measures is being hyped up into a “failed American-backed coup”! We used to be told that the US could make and break governments at will, now even an improbable “failed coup” is worth claiming credit for!

  3. 3bancan said on October 5th, 2010 at 10:26am #

    MichaelKenny said on October 5th, 2010 at 9:46am #

    Yeah, those damned liars who are hyping up “a street disturbance during a demonstration against austerity measures” into a “failed American-backed coup”…

  4. Unga_Khan said on October 5th, 2010 at 5:11pm #

    A more in-depth (and less speculative) look at the coup attempt can be found in this piece from CounterPunch:

    http://www.counterpunch.org/maher10012010.html

  5. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 6:09pm #

    Friday, October 1, 2010

    Behind the Coup in Ecuador – The Attack on ALBA

    By Eva Golinger

    Translation: Machetera

    The latest coup attempt against one of the countries in the Bolivarian Alliance For The People of Our America (ALBA) is attempt to impede Latin American integration and the advance of revolutionary democratic processes. The rightwing is on the attack in Latin America. Its success in 2009 in Honduras against the government of Manuel Zelaya energized it and gave it the strength and confidence to strike again against the people and revolutionary governments in Latin America.

    The elections of Sunday, September 26th in Venezuela, while victorious for the Venezuelan United Socialist Party (PSUV), also ceded space to the most reactionary and dangerous destabilizing forces at the service of imperial interests. The United States managed to situate key elements in the Venezuelan National Assembly, giving them a platform to move forward with their conspiratorial schemes to undermine Venezuelan democracy.

    The day after the elections in Venezuela, the main advocate for peace in Colombia, Piedad Córdoba, was dismissed as a Senator in the Republic of Colombia, by Colombia’s Inspector General, on the basis of falsified evidence and accusations. But the attack against Senator Córdoba is a symbol of the attack against progressive forces in Colombia who seek true and peaceful solutions to the war in which they have been living for more than 60 years.

    And now, Thursday, September 30th, was the dawn of a coup d’etat in Ecuador. Insubordinate police took over a number of facilities in the capital of Quito, creating chaos and panic in the country. Supposedly, they were protesting against a new law approved by the National Assembly on Wednesday, which according to them reduced labor benefits.

    In an attempt to resolve the situation, President Rafael Correa went to meet with the rebellious police but was attacked with heavy objects and teargas, causing a wound on his leg and teargas asphyxiation. He was taken to a military hospital in Quito, where he was later kidnapped and held against his will, prevented from leaving.

    Meanwhile, popular movements took to the streets of Quito, demanding the liberation of their President, democratically re-elected the previous year by a huge majority. Thousands of Ecuadorans raised their voices in support of President Correa, trying to rescue their democracy from the hands of coup-plotters who were looking to provoke the forced resignation of the national government.

    In a dramatic development, President Correa was rescued in an operation by Special Forces from the Ecuadoran military in the late evening hours. Correa denounced his kidnapping by the coup-plotting police and laid responsibility for the coup d’etat directly upon former President, Lucio Gutiérrez. Gutiérrez was a presidential candidate in 2009 against President Correa, and lost in a landslide when more than 55% voted for Correa.

    During today’s events, Lucio Gutiérrez declared in an interview, “The end of Correa’s tyranny is at hand,” also asking for the “dissolution of Parliament and a call for early presidential elections.”

    But beyond the key role played by Gutiérrez, there are external factors involved in this attempted coup d’etat that are moving their pieces once again.

    Infiltration of the Police

    According to journalist Jean-Guy Allard, an official report from Ecuador’s Defense Minister, Javier Ponce, distributed in October of 2008 revealed “how US diplomats dedicated themselves to corrupting the police and the Armed Forces.”

    The report confirmed that police units “maintain an informal economic dependence on the United States, for the payment of informants, training, equipment and operations.”

    In response to the report, US Ambassador in Ecuador, Heather Hodges, justified the collaboration, saying “We work with the government of Ecuador, with the military and with the police, on objectives that are very important for security.” According to Hodges, the work with Ecuador’s security forces is related to the “fight against drug trafficking.”

    The Ambassador

    Ambassador Hodges was sent to Ecuador in 2008 by then President George W. Bush. Previously she successfully headed up the embassy in Moldova, a socialist country formerly part of the Soviet Union. She left Moldova sowing the seeds for a “colored revolution” that took place, unsuccessfully, in April of 2009 against the majority communist party elected to parliament.

    Hodges headed the Office of Cuban Affairs within the US State Department in 1991, as its Deputy Director. The department was dedicated to the promotion of destabilization in Cuba. Two years later she was sent to Nicaragua in order to consolidate the administration of Violeta Chamorro, the president selected by the United States following the dirty war against the Sandinista government, which led to its exit from power in 1989.

    When Bush sent her to Ecuador, it was with the intention of sowing destabilization against Correa, in case the Ecuadoran president refused to subordinate himself to Washington’s agenda. Hodges managed to increase the budget for USAID and the NED [National Endowment for Democracy] directed toward social organizations and political groups that promote US interests, including within the indigenous sector.

    In the face of President Correa’s re-election in 2009, based on a new constitution approved in 2008 by a resounding majority of men and women in Ecuador, the Ambassador began to foment destabilization.

    USAID

    Certain progressive social groups have expressed their discontent with the policies of the Correa government. There is no doubt that legitimate complaints and grievances against his government exist. Not all groups and organizations in opposition to Correa’s policies are imperial agents. But a sector among them does exist which receives financing and guidelines in order to provoke destabilizing situations in the country that go beyond the natural expressions of criticism and opposition to a government.

    In 2010, the State Department increased USAID’s budget in Ecuador to more than $38 million dollars. In the most recent years, a total of $5,640,000 in funds were invested in the work of “decentralization” in the country. One of the main executors of USAID’s programs in Ecuador is the same enterprise that operates with the rightwing in Bolivia: Chemonics, Inc. At the same time, NED issued a grant of $125,806 to the Center for Private Enterprise (CIPE) to promote free trade treaties, globalization, and regional autonomy through Ecuadoran radio, television and newspapers, along with the Ecuadoran Institute of Economic Policy.

    Organizations in Ecuador such as Participación Ciudadana and Pro-justicia [Citizen Participation and Pro-Justice], as well as members and sectors of CODEMPE, Pachakutik, CONAIE, the Corporación Empresarial Indígena del Ecuador [Indigenous Enterprise Corporation of Ecuador] and Fundación Qellkaj [Qellkaj Foundation] have had USAID and NED funds at their disposal.

    During the events of September 30 in Ecuador, one of the groups receiving USAID and NED financing, Pachakutik, sent out a press release backing the coup-plotting police and demanding the resignation of President Correa, holding him responsible for what was taking place. The group even went so far as to accuse him of a “dictatorial attitude.” Pachakutik entered into a political alliance with Lucio Gutiérrez in 2002 and its links with the former president are well known:

    “PACHAKUTIK ASKS PRESIDENT CORREA TO RESIGN AND CALLS FOR THE FORMING OF A SINGLE NATIONAL FRONT

    Press Release 141

    In the face of the serious political turmoil and internal crisis generated by the dictatorial attitude of President Rafael Correa, who has violated the rights of public servants as well as society, the head of the Pachakutik Movement, Cléver Jiménez, called on the indigenous movement, social movements and democratic political organizations to form a single national front to demand the exit of President Correa, under the guidelines established by Article 130, Number 2 of the Constitution, which says: “The National Assembly will dismiss the President of the Republic in the following cases: 2) For serious political crisis and domestic turmoil.”

    Jiménez backed the struggle of the country’s public servants, including the police troops who have mobilized against the regime’s authoritarian policies which are an attempt to eliminate acquired labor rights. The situation of the police and members of the Armed Forces should be understood as a just action by public servants, whose rights have been made vulnerable.

    This afternoon, Pachakutik is calling on all organizations within the indigenous movement, workers, democratic men and women to build unity and prepare new actions to reject Correa’s authoritarianism, in defense of the rights and guarantees of all Ecuadorans.

    Press Secretary

    PACHAKUTIK BLOQUE”

    The script used in Venezuela and Honduras repeats itself. They try to hold the President and the government responsible for the “coup,” later forcing their exit from power. The coup against Ecuador is the next phase in the permanent aggression against ALBA and revolutionary movements in the region.

    The Ecuadoran people remain mobilized in their rejection of the coup attempt, while progressive forces in the region have come together to express their solidarity and support of President Correa and his government.

    http://www.chavezcode.com/2010/10/behind-coup-in-ecuador-rightwing-attack.html

  6. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 6:14pm #

    Friday, October 1, 2010

    BULLET THAT HIT PRESIDENT RAFAEL CORREA’S ROOM

    DURING THE ATTEMPTED COUP YESTERDAY IN ECUADOR AGAINST PRESIDENT RAFAEL CORREA, BULLETS HIT THE ROOM HE WAS SEQUESTERED IN DURING THE LATE NIGHT RESCUE OPERATION. INVESTIGATORS CONCLUDED COUP FORCES WERE ATTEMPTING TO ASSASSINATE HIM BEFORE HE COULD BE RESCUED. THE CAR THAT TOOK HIM BACK TO THE PRESIDENTIAL PALACE WAS ALSO HIT WITH SEVERAL BULLETS, INCLUDING ON THE SIDE WHERE HE WAS TRAVELING.

    (Caps in the original, photo at link of the bullit hole)

    http://www.chavezcode.com/2010/10/bullet-that-hit-president-rafael.html

  7. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 6:18pm #

    What Castro had to say on the day of the coup:

    Incredible News
    by Fidel Castro

    As I was concluding some Reflections on the dismissal of Colombian Senator Piedad Córdoba, incredible news began to arrive from Ecuador. I’ve spent hours listening to it. Minute by minute, ferment is growing.

    At 5:12 PM, Cuban time, condemnations of the coup are proliferating. The most prestigious Latin American leaders, such as Chávez and Evo, have issued their energetic condemnations, loud and clear. The OAS in meeting has no choice. Its members are angry, and even Chinchilla is protesting. Even the new President of Colombia has said that he supports Correa.

    President Rafael Correa is firm. He is no pushover. The people are very well organized. The coup, in my opinion, is already lost.

    Even Obama and Clinton will have no choice but to condemn it.

    Fidel Castro
    30 September 2010
    5:38 pm

  8. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 6:24pm #

    Obama administration fingerprints on Ecuador coup attempt

    By Wayne Madsen

    Oct 5, 2010, 00:21

    (WMR) — Using the standard CIA playbook on toppling democratically-elected governments in Latin America, the Obama administration, which was not happy with Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa’s moves to increase state control over oil companies in the nation and his decision to oust the United States military from its airbase at Manta, appears to have suffered a major defeat in the failed coup attempt in Ecuador by police officers and Air Force personnel who were backed by rightist elements in the National Assembly and business community.

    Correa was re-elected with an overwhelming majority last year after he gave the U.S. military its walking papers from the Manta airbase. The Pentagon and CIA have been working to topple Correa ever since by pumping money into opposition political parties and other groups through NGOs funded by the U.S. National Endowment for Democracy.

    In a statement from Correa after his rescue from the Police Hospital in Quito by a military special operations team, the president warned of a larger conspiracy launched against him by his political opposition, saying the “attempt at destabilization is the result of a strategy that has been brewing for quite some time. A barrage of messages and misinformation have been given to the National Police, which today has been realized through violent actions from a conspiracy attempt.”

    Correa’s predecessor, the pro-U.S. Lucio Gutierrez, who is wedded to foreign oil company interests in the country, was accused by the government of covertly supporting the police and Air Force mutineers.

    Although Secretary of State Hillary Clinton issued a weak statement saying the United States backed Correa, it came one day after Clinton heaped praise on former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, the person who helped to craft the September 11, 1973, coup in Chile and the assassination of its progressive president, Salvador Allende. In fact, Clinton and Obama had given military and political support to the right-wing junta that ousted democratically-elected progressive President Manuel Zelaya in Honduras in June 2009 and has fought against allowing the ousted democratically-elected president of Haiti, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, to return to his country from exile in South Africa after the CIA-engineered coup against him in 2004.

    Clinton’s tepid response to the attempted coup against Correa was in marked contrast to the strong denunciations of the attempted coup and messages of support for Correa that came from Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Spain.

    And the fact that Correa, like Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, who was briefly ousted in an April 2002 coup organized by the CIA, was held as a virtual hostage at the Police Hospital in Quito for the greater part of a day provided a grim reminder of an old CIA tactic in staging coups in Latin America. Chavez was briefly held hostage on a Venezuelan island in the Caribbean while a U.S.-registered plane stood by to fly him into exile. In an emergency Latin American summit meeting in Argentina, Chavez saw the U.S. behind the events in Ecuador. He said, “The Yankee extreme right is trying right now, through arms and violence, to retake control of the continent.”

    Chavez’s own experience with a CIA backed coup and the June 2009 coup, supported by the Pentagon, CIA, and Mossad against his ally Zelaya in Honduras, makes him an expert on CIA and Mossad tactics in the region. Informed sources have told WMR that Correa and Chavez are currently comparing notes on the coups launched against them.

    Ecuadorian intelligence will be looking closely at the whereabouts of key CIA personnel stationed at the CIA station at the US embassy in Quito and a smaller CIA station within the US Agency for International Development (USAID) mission in Guayaquil. In the 2002 coup attempt against Chavez, the US embassy’s top CIA and DIA officers were discovered to be helping to direct the coup from Venezuelan military installations.

    Clinton’s State Department has been casting Ecuador in a bad light throughout the past two years, calling the country “difficult to do business in,” the only real priority that the Obama administration cares about due to its total subservience to Wall Street and the fat cat bankers. The State Department’s “Investment Climate Statement” for Ecuador states: “Ecuador can be a difficult place in which to do business . . . There are restrictions or limitations on private investment in many sectors that apply equally to domestic and foreign investors . . . A 2006 hydrocarbons law imposed new conditions in the petroleum sector that have been problematic for many companies, complicated by a 2007 decree that imposed additional restrictions. A 2008 mining mandate stalled mining activity, and a new Mining Law is expected in early 2009. Negotiations for a free trade agreement between the United State and Ecuador, which would have included investment provisions, stopped in April 2006. The current Government of Ecuador has not expressed interest in restarting negotiations.”

    Correa’s financial policies, as well as his foreign policy that saw him order out the American base at Manta and establish close ties with Venezuela, Iran, and other countries inimical to American and Israeli hegemony, placed a huge CIA and Mossad target on Correa’s back. In June, Ecuador sponsored a resolution at the Organization of American States (OAS) summit in Lima condemning Israel’s attack on the Turkish aid flotilla transporting humanitarian aid to Gaza. Ten nations voted with Ecuador in support of the resolution.

    The uprising among Ecuadorian Air Force ranks, with Air Force personnel taking over and shutting down Quito’s international airport, will have Ecuadorian counter-intelligence personnel looking closely at the possible role of Israeli technicians and trainers who support the Air Force’s 26 Israeli-made Kfir combat planes. Israel also reportedly sold Python-3 air-to-air missiles to the Ecuadorian Air Force in 1997.

    Mossad also has its hooks into the Ecuadorian National Police, where the main coup plotters received support. Mossad is chiefly tasked with spying on Ecuador’s large Ecuadorian-Arab community. The activities of the Mossad station at the Israeli embassy in Quito before and during the coup attempt will also draw the attention of counter-intelligence officers. Last year, Tel Aviv-based On Track Innovations received a contract to provide an electronic biometric-based electronic identification card system to Ecuador’s Central Registry Office.

    http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_6412.shtml

  9. hayate said on October 5th, 2010 at 6:51pm #

    This has nothing to do with the israeloamerican coup attempt in Ecuador, but this is the closest article here atm for this story, which does relate to israeloamerican tyranny and a possible important development against it:

    Pakistan deploys anti-aircraft missiles on Afghan border

    By AZHAR MASOOD | ARAB NEWS

    Published: Oct 5, 2010 00:46 Updated: Oct 5, 2010 00:46

    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has strengthened its air defense with a view to preventing NATO forces from intruding into its territory from Afghanistan.

    The strong US ally has installed anti-aircraft missiles in its tribal regions bordering Afghanistan, well-placed sources told Arab News here on Monday.

    “Now no helicopter will be able to escape after entering into Pakistani territory,” the official sources said.

    Meanwhile, NATO’s chief expressed regret on Monday for the deaths of Pakistani soldiers last week and said he hoped Pakistan’s border would reopen for NATO supplies to Afghanistan as soon as possible.

    Angered by repeated attacks by NATO helicopters on militant targets within its borders, Pakistan blocked one of the supply routes for NATO troops in Afghanistan after a strike killed three Pakistani soldiers in the western Kurram region.

    Analysts and Western officials said Pakistan’s closure of the border for a few days would not seriously impact the war effort in Afghanistan, but it would create political tension that Pakistan could exploit.

    “I expressed my regret for the incident last week in which Pakistani soldiers lost their lives,” Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said after meeting Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi in Brussels.

    “I expressed my hope the border will be open for supplies as soon as possible.”

    The apology came after gunmen attacked a convoy of trucks taking goods to Western forces in Afghanistan on the outskirts of the Pakistani capital, killing three guards.

    Pakistani Taleban militants claimed responsibility.

    Hours later, suspected militants attacked trawlers carrying supplies for NATO through the southwestern province of Baluchistan, killing one man, police said.

    Late on Monday, two missiles from a suspected CIA drone struck a mosque in Mirali in North Waziristan, about 20 km east of the main town of Miranshah, intelligence officials said. Three people were killed.

    Pakistan has officially said the border has been closed for security reasons and the Taleban threat of more attacks will likely prolong the closure of the vital supply route — now in its fifth day — and further strain ties with ally Washington, which has long demanded Pakistan crack down on militants.

    About half of all non-lethal supplies for Western forces in land-locked Afghanistan pass through Pakistan, giving Pakistan considerable leverage over the United States, which needs Pakistan for help in containing the insurgency in Afghanistan.

    “Efforts are underway to resolve this issue, but there is a lot of anger in Pakistan about the border incursion,” a senior Pakistani government official said.

    ISAF spokesman Maj. Joel Harper told Reuters in Kabul that the border closure wouldn’t impact the mission, but that the supply lines are “an important element of the Pakistani economy. It’s important to our logistics stocks.”

    The closures would force more supplies through NATO’s northern supply route through Russia and the central Asian republics, he said.

    “NATO authorities have all along anticipated disruptions in the supply chain and have been stockpiling supplies in advance,” said Kamran Bokhari, South Asia director at STRATFOR global intelligence.

    Andrew Exum, a fellow with the Center for a New American Security and former adviser on Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s assessment team in Afghanistan, said the closures mattered little tactically.

    “Even though it’s painful it doesn’t cripple the mission,” he said. “The larger strategic issue is that we’re seeing a period of rising public tension between the United States and Pakistan.”

    “It’s clear the Pakistanis are frustrated with the United States,” he continued. “It’s clear the Pakistanis are frustrated with the drone strikes in Pakistan. What I don’t think the Pakistanis understand is how frustrated the Americans and the American public are with the Pakistanis.”

    Despite its anger, Pakistan can’t afford to long antagonize an ally that provides $2 billion in military aid a year — aid vital for Pakistan’s own fight against militants, analysts say.

    “There has to be some solution and I think there will be one. But there is an anger and you have to address it,” a Pakistani security official said.

    Officials at the US Embassy in Islamabad said despite the protests by Pakistan and the closing of the border, cooperation in flood relief missions and security assistance continues.

    Rasmussen said the killing of the three Pakistani soldiers was unintended and showed the need to improve coordination between the NATO and the Pakistani military. He said a joint investigation was under way.

    “It is important we step up our cooperation,” he said.

    That cooperation could be slow in coming, however, because a stepped up campaign of drone strikes has infuriated many Pakistanis and made it harder for the government to cooperate with the United States.

    The strikes preceded warnings by Britain and the United States of an increased risk of terrorist attacks in Europe, with Washington saying Al-Qaeda might target transport infrastructure.

    — With input from agencies

    http://arabnews.com/world/article154005.ece

    Will Pakistan actively oppose the israeloamerican/nato aggressors who have regularly been murdering their citizens with impunity? If so, this represents a major change in the region for Pakistan.